Archive

Monthly Archives: October 2013

FILE – In this Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, file photo, specialist Frank Masiello works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes are little changed in early trading on Wall Street as investors pore over a mixed bag of earnings from U.S. companies.

Avon Products, Kraft Foods and MetLife fell after their profits missed Wall Street’s forecasts. Time Warner Cable and Expedia rose after beating expectations.

The Dow Jones industrial average was flat at 15,619 after the first few minutes of trading Thursday.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index was up two points, or 0.1 percent, at 1,765. The Nasdaq composite was up a point at 3,932.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note edged down to 2.53 percent from 2.54 percent.

The S&P 500 index is on track to have its best month since July. It’s up nearly 5 percent for October.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/stock-indexes-little-changed-early-trading-135235970–finance.html
Similar Articles: suntrust   christina aguilera   bruno mars   The Butler   whitney houston  

Advertisements

Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, center, walks with Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., right, and Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, before their meeting. Earlier, the prime minister met with Vice President Joe Biden. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, center, walks with Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., right, and Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, before their meeting. Earlier, the prime minister met with Vice President Joe Biden. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki listens during a meeting with House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., and the committee’s ranking Democrat Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, left, talks with House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., right, during a luncheon meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, left, is greeted by House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., center, and the committee’s ranking Democrat Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, during a luncheon meeting. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

(AP) — Nearly two years after pushing out the U.S. military, Iraq is asking for more American weapons, training and manpower to help fight a bloody resurgence of al-Qaida that has unleashed a level of violence comparable to the darkest days of the nation’s civil war.

The request will be discussed during a White House meeting Friday between Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and President Barack Obama in what Baghdad hopes will be a fresh start in a complicated relationship that has been marked by victories and frustrations for each side.

“We know we have major challenges of our own capabilities being up to the standard. They currently are not,” Lukman Faily, the Iraqi ambassador to the U.S., said in an interview with The Associated Press. “We need to gear up, to deal with that threat more seriously. We need support and we need help.”

He added: “We have said to the Americans we’d be more than happy to discuss all the options short of boots on the ground.”

“Boots on the ground” means military forces. The U.S. withdrew all but a few hundred of its troops from Iraq in December 2011 after Baghdad refused to renew a security agreement to extend legal immunity for Americans forces that would have let more stay.

At the time, the withdrawal was hailed as a victory for the Obama administration, which campaigned on ending the Iraq war and had little appetite for pushing Baghdad into a new security agreement. But within months, violence began creeping up in the capital and across the country as Sunni Muslim insurgents lashed out at Shiites, angered by a widespread belief that Sunnis have been sidelined by the Shiite-led government, and with no U.S. troops to keep them in check.

More than 5,000 Iraqis have been killed in attacks since April, and suicide bombers launched 38 strikes in the last month alone.

Al-Maliki is expected to ask Obama for new assistance to bolster its military and fight al-Qaida. Faily said that could include everything from speeding up the delivery of U.S. aircraft, missiles, interceptors and other weapons, to improving national intelligence systems. And when asked, he did not rule out the possibility of asking the U.S. to send military special forces or additional CIA advisers to Iraq to help train and assist counterterror troops.

If the U.S. does not commit to providing the weapons or other aid quickly, “we will go elsewhere,” Faily said. That means Iraq will step up diplomacy with nations like China or Russia that would be more than happy to increase their influence in Baghdad at U.S. expense.

The two leaders also will discuss how Iraq can improve its fractious government, which so often is divided among sectarian or ethnic lines, to give it more confidence with a bitter and traumatized public.

The ambassador said no new security agreement would be needed to give immunity to additional U.S. advisers or trainers in Iraq — the main sticking point that led to U.S. withdrawal. And he said Iraq would pay for the additional weapons or other assistance.

A senior Obama administration official said Wednesday that U.S. officials were not planning to send U.S. trainers to Iraq and that Baghdad had not asked for them. The administration official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief reporters by name.

U.S. officials were prepared to help Iraq with an across-the-board approach that did not focus just on military or security gaps, the administration official said. The aid under consideration might include more weapons for Iraqi troops who do not have necessary equipment to battle al-Qaida insurgents, he said.

Administration officials consider the insurgency, which has rebranded itself as the Islamic State of Iraq in the Levant, a major and increasing threat both to Iraq and the U.S., the official said.

U.S. and Iraqi officials see a possible solution in trying to persuade insurgents to join forces with Iraqi troops and move away from al-Qaida, following a pattern set by so-called Awakening Councils in western Iraq that marked a turning point in the war. Faily said much of the additional aid — including weapons and training — would go toward this effort.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who opposed the U.S. troop withdrawal in 2011, said Iraq likely would not get the aid until al-Maliki, a Shiite, makes strides in making the government more inclusive to Sunnis.

“If he expects the kind of assistance that he’s asking for, we need a strategy and we need to know exactly how that’s going to be employed, and we need to see some changes in Iraq,” McCain said Wednesday after a tense meeting on Capitol Hill with al-Maliki. “The situation is deteriorating and it’s unraveling, and he’s got to turn it around.”

Al-Maliki’s plea for aid is somewhat ironic, given that he refused to budge in 2011 on letting U.S. troops stay in Iraq with legal immunity Washington said they must have to defend themselves in the volatile country. But it was a fiercely unpopular political position in Iraq, which was unable to prosecute Blackwater Worldwide security contractors who opened fire in a Baghdad square in 2007, killing at least 13 passers-by.

James F. Jeffrey, who was the U.S. ambassador in Baghdad when the U.S. troops left, called it a “turnabout” by al-Maliki. He said Iraq desperately needs teams of U.S. advisers, trainers, intelligence and counterterror experts to beat back al-Qaida.

“We have those people,” said Jeffrey, who retired from the State Department after leaving Baghdad last year. “We had plans to get them in after 2011. They can be under embassy privileges and immunities. They will cost the American people almost nothing. They will, by and large, not be in any more danger than our State Department civilians. And they could mean all the difference between losing an Iraq that 4,500 Americans gave their lives for.”

Nearly 4,500 U.S. troops were killed in Iraq between the 2003 invasion and the 2011 withdrawal. More than 100,000 Iraqi were killed in that time.

___

Follow Lara Jakes on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/larajakesAP

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/3d281c11a96b4ad082fe88aa0db04305/Article_2013-10-30-US-United-States-Iraq/id-c8f6fd7992284921b5c254dd6f038b2c
Tags: Jonas Brothers   Time Change 2013   nicki minaj   betrayal   apple stock  

Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy’s devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood. “Restricted Use” signs are plastered on many front doors. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy’s devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood. “Restricted Use” signs are plastered on many front doors. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the new dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago, Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

(AP) — A year after Superstorm Sandy deluged coastal communities with seawater, many people still can’t believe they’re not back in their homes. Others are thankful for small victories in the long, arduous recovery process.

Devastated residents on Tuesday recalled the help they got from strangers in the days and months after Sandy. Some have mostly recovered from the storm, while others are still homeless or living without heat. In one touching moment, mothers sang “Happy birthday” to their 1-year-old babies who were rescued from darkened hospitals at Sandy’s peak.

Sandy came ashore on Oct. 29, 2012, sending floodwaters pouring across the densely populated barrier islands of Long Island and the Jersey shore. In New York City, the storm surge hit nearly 14 feet, swamping the city’s subway and commuter rail tunnels and knocking out power to the southern third of Manhattan.

The storm was blamed for at least 182 deaths in the U.S. — including 68 in New York and 71 in New Jersey — and property damage estimated at $65 billion.

Here is a look at anniversary observances through a series of vignettes detailing how people are commemorating the unprecedented storm:

___

Myra Camacho’s home in the Rockaways still has no electricity.

She spent nearly two months after Sandy trying to survive in her frigid, powerless home with her boyfriend, Walter Negron.

“We wrapped ourselves in blankets. We ate out of the churches,” Negron said.

They moved out after Camacho had a heart attack. She moved in with relatives. He’s been staying elsewhere.

Workers restored the home’s heating system and did some electrical work, but it wasn’t enough to fix the building’s ruined circuitry. Camacho had no flood insurance and can’t work because of poor health. Negron lost his job at a restaurant because of the storm.

Their luck might be about to change. The couple spent Tuesday morning with an inspector from a nonprofit housing group, who told them he could help with the restoration. He estimated it would cost $15,000.

“He said, ‘Don’t worry about it. We’re going to take care of it,'” Camacho said. “I don’t know. We’ve heard things like this before. I’m hopeful.”

___

One year after Sandy, what Ellen Bednarz of Sayreville, N.J., remembered most was the kindness of the debris haulers who carted away the family’s ruined possessions.

“I never saw more caring people,” she said at an event to thank firefighters who used boats to rescue scores of people.

Before the storm hit, Bednarz and her family hastily moved their patio set, family room and office furniture to a storage unit and checked into a hotel. Only when they were allowed back to their split-level days later did they see the water had risen 14 feet — destroying everything, even the items the family had moved upstairs.

Bednarz is renting an apartment and waiting to close on a government home buyout.

“It’s over,” she said. “It’s probably one of the worst years of my life, but it’s behind me.”

___

When Sandy darkened much of the city, some New Yorkers were only hours old. Others weren’t even born.

On Tuesday, babies filled a Manhattan hospital room to celebrate their first birthdays — and their survival.

Kenneth Hulett III weighed only 2 pounds when emergency medical workers rushed him out of the New York Hospital intensive care unit and down the stairs while hooked up to an oxygen tank. His mother, Emily Blatt, says her faith sustained her as she was evacuated on an orange sled.

That day, more than 40 babies were safety moved from the hospital to other facilities.

On Tuesday, their parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, “Happy birthday, dear babies.”

___

Visiting a flood-damaged firehouse in Seaside Park, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said Tuesday was a day to remember volunteers and first responders who risked their lives to save others. Christie, who stayed overnight at the governor’s beach house in neighboring Island Beach State Park, said he woke up and was struck by “just how much different we all feel a year later.”

“I want us to think of how much better things look today than they did a year ago and celebrate that,” Christie said. “We also have to acknowledge that there’s still thousands of people out of their homes.”

New York Gov. Cuomo visited the National Museum of the American Indian in lower Manhattan, which was temporarily shut down last year by flooding and power outages.

Cuomo recalled the “feeling of powerlessness” seeing the southern tip of Manhattan submerged in water. He also warned that extreme weather is “the new normal” but said the city and state is now better equipped to withstand it.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg visited Staten Island, Coney Island and the Rockaways, where he thanked and chatted with workers.

“Most New Yorkers are I suspect are struggling with somber memories today, which is only natural,” Bloomberg said. “A year ago we endured the worst natural disaster ever to strike our city.”

___

Aiman Youssef found out the other day that one of his neighbors has been living in his own Staten Island garage.

He says many people in his shorefront neighborhood are still displaced or living in partially restored homes, often without basic facilities.

“A lot of people have moved out of the area,” Youssef said. “A lot of houses went into foreclosure.”

Some homeowners are still reluctant to accept help, Youssef said, while others have been stymied by bureaucracy. He pointed to a bungalow across the street from his tent on Midland Avenue.

A woman is living there without heat despite a city program that was supposed to restore heat, electric and water service, he said.

“We were lower middle class,” Youssef said. “Now we’re poor.”

___

Sam Darata recalled how he and his son stayed in their house in Little Ferry, N.J., as floodwaters coursed down their block and prompted many neighbors to seek rescue by boat.

“In retrospect, I should have left,” he said. “If I’d known there was going to be 3 feet of water in here, I’d have been gone.”

Like many others in the town, Darata didn’t carry flood insurance because it never seemed necessary. He said he received a $10,000 federal homeowners’ grant about two months ago but has had to tap into his retirement savings to cover the additional costs of replacing a boiler, refrigerator and other appliances.

Like others, he expressed concern that authorities haven’t announced specific plans for preventing future flooding.

“I would rather give up the money I got to help build something that’s going to prevent this from happening again,” he said.

___

The lobby of the Wall Street Inn, a boutique hotel located in a 19th-century building in lower Manhattan, was lonely and empty. But manager Rachel Fogel said business is steady again despite initial fears that the hotel started by her grandfather might never come back.

The hotel was evacuated as the storm hit. The scene on South William Street the next day was discouraging, she said.

“It was dark. It was cold. It smelled like gasoline,” Fogel said.

Weeks of work was needed on basement electrical and heating systems before the hotel reopened in December. Contractors were the first post-storm guests.

Now the regulars are back. One was a man who came back months later to retrieve dry cleaning he sent on the eve of Sandy.

___

Associated Press reporters Wayne Parry in Seaside Park, N.J., David Porter in Little Ferry, N.J., Angela Delli Santi in Sayreville, N.J., Frank Eltman in Babylon, N.Y., and Verena Dobnik, Jonathan Lemire, David Caruso and Tom Hays in New York contributed to this report.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-10-29-Superstorm-Anniversary/id-999c3b30eaaf4091b9336a53de40984e
Similar Articles: Government Shutdown Over   Joseph Gordon-Levitt   burn notice   Sarin gas   Charlie Manuel  

“Everybody’s getting naked,” Katy Perry lamented to NPR host Scott Simon in an interview that aired Saturday, Oct. 26. “I mean, I’ve been naked before, but I don’t feel like I have to always get naked to be noticed,” she said of her pop star counterparts who are becoming increasingly focused on stripping down.

PHOTOS: Rihanna’s sexiest nude moments

Although Perry, 29, refused to discuss “anyone in particular,” the “Roar” singer suggested in her interview that her fellow female artists — “all of them” — simply “put it away.”

Perry’s comments follow a particularly skimpily-clothed year of young female pop stars, including a naked Miley Cyrus, 20, swinging on a wrecking ball, Rihanna, 25, stripping down for magazine covers and Nicki Minaj, 30, shocking her social media followers with unwarranted pictures. “I mean, it’s like everybody’s so naked,” remarked Perry in the pre-recorded session. In an odd overlap of commentary and action, Lady Gaga, 27, stripped down while on stage in a London nightclub on Saturday, Oct. 26 as she performed her new single, “Venus.”

PHOTOS: Miley Cyrus’ raciest outfits

Perry, however, understands she should not be the judge of pop stars’ lack of apparel these days. The California Gurls crooner, who appeared nude in the music video, admitted to NPR, “I’ve taken it out here and there. And I’m not necessarily judging.”

She added, “I’m just saying sometimes it’s nice to play that card but also it’s nice to play other cards. And I know I have that sexy card in my deck but I don’t always have to use that card.”

PHOTOS: Katy Perry’s most memorable music video looks

Source: http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/katy-perry-tells-naked-pop-star-peers-to-put-it-away-20132810
Related Topics: krispy kreme   Manny Diaz   rosh hashanah   NSync   Moto X  

Humanity's first-ever deep space craft powers up for the first time

Quietly, NASA keeps advancing in their manned deep space exploration: you’re looking at Orion—the first spaceship that hopefully will leave Earth and the Moon behind en route to Mars and other places in the solar system—powering up for the first time ever. It feels like a restart of Humanity’s journey to the stars after the Apollo program shut down.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/BZE3Em9-Jh8/@barrett
Tags: walking dead   liberace   Jordan Linn Graham   Delbert Belton   Dufnering  

Danvers police are seen Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013 at the Danvers High School, investigating a report of a sudden death inside the school in Danvers, Mass. A 14-year-old Massachusetts high school student is facing a murder charge in the death of a 24-year-old teacher found dead in the woods behind the school. Essex District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett on Wednesday identified the victim as Danvers High School teacher Colleen Ritzer, of Andover. (AP Photo/Boston Herald, Mark Garfinkel) BOSTON GLOBE OUT; METRO BOSTON OUT; MAGS OUT; ONLINE OUT NO SALES

Danvers police are seen Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013 at the Danvers High School, investigating a report of a sudden death inside the school in Danvers, Mass. A 14-year-old Massachusetts high school student is facing a murder charge in the death of a 24-year-old teacher found dead in the woods behind the school. Essex District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett on Wednesday identified the victim as Danvers High School teacher Colleen Ritzer, of Andover. (AP Photo/Boston Herald, Mark Garfinkel) BOSTON GLOBE OUT; METRO BOSTON OUT; MAGS OUT; ONLINE OUT NO SALES

Massachusetts State Police detectives are seen at the Danvers High School, investigating a report of a sudden death inside the school, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Danvers, Mass. A 14-year-old high school student is facing a murder charge in the death of a 24-year-old teacher found dead in the woods behind the school. Essex District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett on Wednesday identified the victim as Danvers High School teacher Colleen Ritzer, of Andover. (AP Photo/Boston Herald, Mark Garfinkel) BOSTON GLOBE OUT; METRO BOSTON OUT; MAGS OUT; ONLINE OUT NO SALES

Gardner Trask, chairman of the Danvers Board of Selectman, embraces an unidentified woman inside Danvers High School prior to a press conference by Jonathan Blodget, Essex District Attorney, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013 where he announced the homicide death of Danvers math teacher Colleen Ritzer at Danvers High School in Danvers, Mass. A 14-year-old Massachusetts high school student is facing a murder charge in the death of the teacher found dead in the woods behind the school. (AP Photo/Boston Herald, Mark Garfinkel) BOSTON GLOBE OUT; METRO BOSTON OUT; MAGS OUT; ONLINE OUT NO SALES

DANVERS, Mass. (AP) — A 14-year-old high school student described by classmates as soft-spoken and pleasant was accused of killing a well-liked math teacher, whose body was found in the woods behind the school.

Law enforcement officials recovered the remains of 24-year-old Danvers High School teacher Colleen Ritzer early Wednesday, Essex District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett said. The teen, Philip Chism, was arraigned Wednesday in Salem on a murder charge and ordered held without bail.

Ritzer was reported missing late Tuesday night after she didn’t come home from work or answer her cellphone. Investigators found blood in a second-floor school bathroom and soon located her body, Blodgett said. He did not say how Ritzer died.

“She was a very, very respected, loved teacher,” Blodgett said, calling the killing a “terrible tragedy.”

The boy also was reported missing Tuesday after not coming home from school. He was spotted walking along a road in neighboring Topsfield at about 12:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Investigators said in court documents that the arrest was made based on statements by the suspect and corroborating evidence at multiple scenes. They said they also recovered video surveillance.

At his arraignment in adult court Wednesday afternoon, Chism’s defense attorney argued for the proceeding to be closed and her client to be allowed to stay hidden because of his age. The judge denied the request. The attorney declined to comment outside court.

Ritzer had a Twitter account where she gave homework assignments, encouraged students and described herself as a “math teacher often too excited about the topics I’m teaching.”

She was a 2011 graduate of Assumption College in Worcester, a school spokeswoman said Wednesday. She graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in math, a minor in psychology and a secondary education concentration, according to the college’s 2011 commencement program.

Chris Weimert, 17, was a student in Ritzer’s geometry class last year. He said she had taught at the school for two years and was a warm, welcoming person who would stand outside her classroom and say hello to students she didn’t teach.

“She was the nicest teacher anyone could ever have. She always had a warm smile on her face,” he said.

Weimert said the suspect, who he knew from seeing him around school, “seemed like a good kid.” He said, “It really threw the whole town of Danvers a curve ball.”

Kyle Cahill, a junior, said he knows Chism from the soccer team. He said the 14-year-old moved to Massachusetts from Tennessee before the school year began and was a top goal scorer on the school’s junior varsity team.

He called him a quiet, nice kid.

“He wasn’t violent at all. He was really the opposite of aggressive,” Cahill said.

Cahill said there was a soccer team dinner Tuesday night that the accused teen skipped, and team members were wondering where he was.

“We’re all just a family. It just amazes me really,” he said. “I’m just stunned.”

Ryan Kelleher, a senior who also plays soccer, said the arrest of the soft-spoken Chism didn’t make sense to him.

“From what I know about him and seeing him every day, it just doesn’t add up that he would do such a thing, unless this was all an act to fool somebody,” the 17-year-old said.

Kelleher took Ritzer’s algebra class last year and said hello to her on Tuesday in the hallway. He said students related to the young teacher, who liked to wear jeans and UGG boots just like the students.

Ritzer lived at home with her 20-year-old brother and her sister, a high school senior. The close-knit family was often outside, barbecuing, spending time together and enjoying each other’s company, neighbors said.

Mary Duffy has lived next door to the Ritzers in the comfortable, suburban neighborhood in Andover since the family moved there more than two decades ago. She had known Colleen Ritzer from the time she was a baby and said the Ritzers’ oldest child had just one ambition in life: to be a high school math teacher.

“All I ever heard is that she loved her job,” Duffy said.

Ritzer’s uncle Dale Webster provided a brief written statement in which the family asked for privacy.

“At this time, we are mourning the tragic death or our amazing, beautiful daughter and sister,” the statement read. “Everyone that knew and loved Colleen knew of her passion for teaching and how she mentored each and every one of her students.”

There was no reason to believe anyone else was involved and there was no public safety danger, authorities said.

All public schools in Danvers, about 20 miles north of Boston, were closed Wednesday.

The high school’s students were planning a candlelight vigil Wednesday evening.

Ritzer is the second teacher allegedly killed by a student in the U.S. this week. A Sparks, Nev., middle school teacher was allegedly shot by a 12-year-old student on Monday.

___

Associated Press writer Lynne Tuohy in Andover contributed to this report.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-10-23-Schools%20Closed-Homicide/id-55d0909c424d4f70b236a0e6f7966a21
Similar Articles: Michelle Rodriguez   mark sanchez   monday night football   djokovic   Lady Gaga Applause  

Hackathons can sometimes turn into a sea of laptops and monitors, so perhaps it’s no surprise that, as I wandered the Disrupt Europe Hackathon today, I found myself drawn to a table covered with wiring and gadgets, including a Geiger counter.

The idea was pretty unusual, too — as the four-person team explained it to me, they’re trying to build a system for collecting and displaying crowdsourced radiation data.

Philipp Wagner (the team member actually working with the Geiger counter) explained that in situations like the Fukushima nuclear disaster, you might not trust the company involved to give you accurate warnings about the radiation danger. So a participant in the Open Radioactivity Warning System would receive their own Geiger counter that collects and shares live data online.

The team’s hardware attracted other passersby, and one of them suggested that a similar project already exists. I think they were talking about Safecast, a project that was originally funded through Kickstarter in the wake of Fukushima — right now, it looks like Safecast is focused on Japan.

radioactivity team

The team comes from the Austrian cities of Linz and Vienna, and it’s their first time at Disrupt. Philipp attributed the idea to his teammate Alex Entinger, who seems to have brought the the group together — he went to university with one of his teammates (Matthias Schörghuber), another is his girlfriend (Adriana Ghira), and he said he recruited Philipp because they work on the same floor.

It seems like the system is still very much a work in progress, but Alex said he’s determined to have something finished for the hackathon presentations tomorrow. In the meantime, you can see an initial version on the website of Entinger’s startup, LXRobotics.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/RXABshDjsB4/
Category: Prince George christening   Wentworth Miller   nfl schedule   Yahoo Fantasy Football   Samsung